×

Water supply

North Jersey District Water Supply Commission

http://www.njdwsc.com

The North Jersey District Water Supply Commission (NJDWSC) was established in 1916 by the New Jersey State Legislature to develop, acquire, and operate water supply resources for municipalities in the "North Jersey District" defined as the 12 northernmost counties of the state. Today, the Commission oversees the operation of the largest water supply operation in the State of New Jersey, including more than 95-square-miles of watershed area, two major reservoirs, two river-diversion pumping stations, and a 210-million gallon/day (MGD) water filtration plant. At peak capacity, the NJDWSC's facilities can supply over 200-MGD of water to its contracting municipalities, thereby serving the water needs of more than 3 million people in Northern New Jersey.

  • 12/8/2013
  • 8
  • 0

Greenville Utilities Commission

http://www.guc.com

Since 1905, Greenville Utilities has been an integral part of Greenville-Pitt County, growing and progressing along with our expanding service area. GUC provides electric, water, sewer and natural gas services to the City of Greenville and 75% of Pitt County. We serve a combined total of more than 135,800 customer connections. Greenville Utilities is owned by the citizens of Greenville but operates under a separate charter issued by the N.C.

  • 12/8/2013
  • 7
  • 0

Bluegrass Water Supply Commission

http://www.bluegrasswater.com

The BWSC is a group of municipal representatives in the region who have also been studying the water supply deficit and who have concluded through their research that a water supply solution is needed. The company has been working with the group for eight years. The company is currently in negotiations with the BWSC on a potential joint partnership of the water treatment plant and water transmission line. The BWSC's board approved in January 2007 to fund a second design of the treatment plant, which expands the plant's treatment capacity to help meet BWSC communities' additional water demands (which totals approximately 5 MGD). I thought the Kentucky River didn't have enough water to meet our needs. The company currently withdraws water from pool 9 of the Kentucky River. It will continue to do so, but, with the new treatment plant, it will also be able to withdraw from pool 3, which is located downstream from pool 9. Between pools 9 and 3, there are numerous cities that discharge treated wastewater back into the river, and there are additional tributaries which flow into the river, providing ample supply to use. In addition, there are no other communities downstream from pool 3 that rely on the river for water supply. How is the water quality in pool 3? The water quality in pool 3 has been researched and the pool is appropriate for use as a drinking water source. The company intends to provide water from the new plant that meets the same nationally-recognized water quality standards as it currently does from its two Fayette County facilities. In the 1990s, the company proposed running a pipeline from the Louisville Water Company to Lexington, but then pulled back from that solution at the Lexington-Fayette Urban County Councils' request. Was the company wrong about that solution? In the 1990s the company determined that the Louisville Water Company solution was the most economical solution for our customers, and no other area providers had addressed a regional approach. In 1999 we agreed to explore a Kentucky River solution and to work on more of a regional solution with other municipalities. That is what we have done, and the outcome is the project we have submitted to the PSC. In today's dollars, the two projects are actually quite comparable in cost. The project we have filed is the least cost, most feasible solution. Why not add a pipeline from the Ohio River to the plant as well? At this time we do not believe there is a need to construct a pipeline to the Ohio River, and it would not be appropriate to ask our customers to pay for this additional cost. When will you start construction? We must first receive PSC approval for the project. We are hopeful that we can begin construction in the fall of 2007, allowing us to complete the project by early summer 2010, several months before the Alltech FEI World Equestrian Games.

  • 12/8/2013
  • 7
  • 0

Medford Water Commission

http://www.medfordwater.org

The Medford Water Commission operates and maintains the water system that delivers high-quality drinking water to around 125,000 Rogue Valley residents. The Commission is an autonomous agency of the City of Medford, Oregon, established through a change in the City's Charter in 1922. Big Butte Springs is the Water Commission's primary water source, with the Rogue River used as a supplement during the summer months.

  • 12/8/2013
  • 9
  • 0

Gold Coast City Council

http://www.goldcoast.qld.gov.au

Gold Coast City Council is the local government entity located on Australia's eastern seaboard. A gateway to the Great Barrier Reef, Coral Sea and Pacific Ocean, the Gold Coast is located in south-east Queensland and is a premier location for the manufacture of recreational boats and the manufacture of components, equipment and accessories. There is a strong marine service industry as well with designers, docking systems manufacturers, boat broking and world-class marinas.

  • 12/8/2013
  • 6
  • 0

Note

Not found any data