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Hearings

International Institute of Deaf Services

http://www.enablelight.com

IIDS is one of the channels for fulfilling the great commission of God. By reaching the deaf and hearing communities in an educational setting, raising up bold leaders and teachers and sending out anointed laborers, the deaf will come to know Jesus as their personal Lord and Savior in the Age of Technology. It is the mission of IIDS to train leaders and educators both deaf and hearing, interpreters and workers with the deaf to evangelize, obtain skill development in American Sign Language and Deaf Culture, technology and religious training. Leaders, educators, sign language interpreters, workers/teachers of deaf children and adults around the country will make a dynamic impact on society. The ministry is incorporated and approved by the Internal Revenue Service as a nonprofit charity (5013c). IIDS was founded by Paul William Ellis and incorporated on February 16, 1994.

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Office of Administrative Hearings

http://www.ncoah.com

The Office of Administrative Hearings is an independent state agency which provides impartial Administrative Law Judges to conduct fair and prompt hearings for persons affected by state agency actions. The Office of Administrative Hearings serves as a quasi-judicial tribunal for the expedient, independent and impartial adjudication of contested cases. Its mission is to provide a neutral forum for handling administrative hearings for certain state agencies, with respect for the dignity of individuals and their due process rights.

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Tribunals

http://www.tribunals.gov.uk

The Tribunals Service aims to develop staff to give an effective contribution to delivering our services and achieving their potential. We will support learning and development through courses, workshops, providing learning materials and opportunities to enable staff to acquire knowledge and develop skills necessary to perform their role efficiently and effectively. All employees are offered opportunities for learning and development to enable them to meet: agreed job objectives and performance standards; agreed development objectives; departmental policy on Equality and Diversity; health and safety standards. The programme will meet the Investors in People standard.

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CRTC

http://www.crtc.gc.ca

On May 13th, the CRTC makes public its views regarding cable. It calls cable undertakings "community programming" and states that these enterprises will complement and not compete with over-the-air broadcasters. The CRTC also claims that these systems will help develop "community identities" via local programming and educational services, and encourages the cable companies to become more involved in community broadcasting. A major CRTC hearing starts on May 14 to consider new regulations for Canadian content on radio and television. CRTC is strongly challenged by the Canadian Association of Broadcasters. Its motion to adjourn the hearing is denied. On October 16th, Radio-Quebec is established by law. It is designated to be the province's educational broadcaster. Quebec Broadcasting Bureau Act, S.R.1969 c.17. In September, the Department of Communications launches its Telecommission Study that will examine various aspects of communications policy issues in Canada. Direction to the CRTC on Canadian Ownership, Order in Council P.C. 1969-2229 (November 20, 1969). Broadcast licences may only be issued to Canadians or "eligible Canadian corporations" in which 4/5 of the shares and capital are controlled by Canadians.

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Canadian Human Rights Commission

http://www.chrc-ccdp.ca

Established in 1977, the Canadian Human Rights Commission is empowered by the Canadian Human Rights Act to settle complaints of discrimination in employment and in the provision of services within federal jurisdiction. Under the Employment Equity Act, the Commission ensures that federally regulated employers provide equal opportunities for employment to women, Aboriginal peoples, persons with disabilities and members of visible minorities. The Commission's core focus includes discrimination prevention through providing information to the public; investigating systemic issues that impact specific groups of people or the human rights system as a whole; and addressing key human rights concerns.

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FCC

http://www.fcc.gov

FCC is a national nondenominational organization of families, with regional chapters, who have adopted children from China. FCC provides a network of support for families who have adopted children from China and provides information to prospective parents. FCCNW has over 300 member families throughout the Puget Sound that participate in social activities throughout the year and continuously welcomes new members.

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Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies , Inc.

http://www.calea.org

As CALEA prepares to celebrate its twentieth anniversary in Atlanta, Georgia, in November, it can reflect with satisfaction on a legacy rich with accomplishment. The great strides of the early-to-mid 90s laid the foundation for more recent expansion and refinement of the accreditation program. Since 1996, the Commission has focused substantial attention on outreach to the law enforcement community. It established an executive-level position,Director of Client Services,to ensure that its customers' needs would be in the forefront of daily activities and long-range planning. It created a website, www.calea.org, to enhance communications with customers and visibility in the marketplace. And, it expanded customer training opportunities to provide increased support to agencies seeking accreditation as well as those already accredited. "Our customers know that we are here to serve them," said Jim Brown, CALEA's Director of Client Services. "Perhaps that's one of the reasons why so few of our agencies dropout of the process." Ever mindful of the need to maintain the currency of its standards and the accreditation program, CALEA recently undertook two significant development projects: the Communications Accreditation Program and the Fourth Edition of Standards for Law Enforcement Agencies. The Fourth Edition is the product of the Commission's latest standards review. A rigorous process undertaken by a committee of 31 volunteers, this comprehensive critique saw the elimination of 11 standards; the addition of 14 standards, primarily dealing with emerging technology and computers; and the modification of 111 others. The Commission's continuing commitment to excellence also led to the formation of its communications accreditation program. Knowing the vital role that communications centers play in the delivery of law enforcement services, the Commission formed a partnership with the Association of Public-Safety Communications Officials,International (APCO) to create an accreditation program that would promote superior public safety communications services. Like the law enforcement accreditationÔ program, participation is voluntary, and standards applicability is based on an agency's size and functional responsibilities. Although new, the communications accreditation program has attracted wide and diverse attention. "With the benefits of operating to national standards, verification of performance by a peer group, and enhanced confidence of the service population, who wouldn't want to participate in this accreditation program?" asks Bob Greenlaw, Director of the Northwest Bergen Central Dispatch in Ridgewood, New Jersey. His agency received the first communications accreditation award at CALEA's March 1999 meeting in Denver, Colorado. APCO's collaboration with CALEA is not the first time an outside organization has sought a partnership with the Commission to promote accreditation, nor is it the last. In 1994, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development awarded a five-year grant to the Center for Public Safety, Inc., to provide technical assistance and training to public housing authorities and public housing authority police, including support for CALEA accreditation. Ten public housing police departments were targeted by this grant program and, of them, seven have been accredited, including those in Baltimore City, Boston, Los Angeles, Metropolitan Cuyahoga (Cleveland), Oakland, Philadelphia, and Pittsburgh. An eighth department, the Buffalo Public Housing Authority Police, will be accredited by year's end. Similarly, U.S. Attorney General Janet Reno has authorized the use of asset forfeiture funds to support accreditation activities, and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has reaffirmed that up to 50% of an agency's accreditation fee could be eligible for funding under Section 402 of the Highway Safety Act. Now, as this article is being written, the U.S. House of Representatives is considering the Law Enforcement Trust and Integrity Act of 1999. If enacted as proposed, the Attorney General will be able to make grants available to law enforcement agencies seeking CALEA accreditation or reaccreditation. With growing external support, 532 agencies accredited, increasing numbers of new customers each month, and the finances to sustain and expand operations, CALEA is well positioned for many more years of making a difference in the quality and continuity of law enforcement services. Already its accreditation program has touched 20% of the full-time law enforcement officers serving at the local, county, and state levels in the United States, as well as 10% of regional and provincial officers in Canada. So, what does the future hold? A key priority for CALEA in the coming year will be to strengthen its relationship with the 11 state accreditation programs. "Clearly, there's an untapped market out there," said the Commission's Executive Director, Sylvester Daughtry, former Greensboro, North Carolina, Chief of Police. "State programs have been better able to reach the smaller agencies than we have, but our program is still viewed by most as being the 'golden ring," he continued. "We want to develop a partnership with state accreditation programs so that agencies can progress from state accreditation to CALEA accreditation." To that end, the Commission has established a State Programs Committee and charged it with developing a business plan for presentation and possible adoption at its November meeting in Atlanta. Goals of the plan will be to acknowledge the efforts of state accreditation programs; to ensure the use of a uniform set of standards across accreditation programs; to form a fiduciary relationship between the state programs and CALEA and to formalize CALEA's role in the research, development, and ownership of the standards. CALEA is also looking outside the United States and considering how its program might be useful to emerging nations as they establish their law enforcement functions. Said Commission Chairman, Bill Miller, "Our standards deal with the range of critical law enforcement issues,from use of force to training to ethics to personnel selection to prisoners and holding facilities. So, there are many opportunities for accreditation to be a positive influence. We're going to be talking with the State Department, United Nations, and the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe to see what we can do." Finally, to ensure that the drive, accomplishments, and lessons learned in the past two decades are not defeated in the next, the Commission will be launching a major strategic planning initiative at its upcoming meeting in Atlanta. "We'll be celebrating where we've been and preparing for where we want to go,defining our focus and priorities, setting our goals and milestones, and identifying necessary resources. We want to have a roadmap, like any business, so we don't get off track," said Executive Director Daughtry. How fitting that this plenary process and the Commission's twentieth anniversary will coincide in Atlanta. That's where the first of the original accreditation standards were adopted in September 1980.

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Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation

http://www.fdic.gov

Congress created the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation in 1933 to restore public confidence in the nation's banking system. The FDIC insures deposits at the nation's 8,650 banks and savings associations and it promotes the safety and soundness of these institutions by identifying, monitoring and addressing risks to which they are exposed. The FDIC receives no federal tax dollars-insured financial institutions fund its operations.

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